PG49: Verizon Strike, Tax Day, Presidential Races, Hamilton!

This week, the Guys start things off by looking at the big strike by Verizon workers. Surprisingly, Mike, who is usually ready to man the picket line with strikers, is feeling sort of sympathetic to Verizon (as is Jay, which is a lot less surprising). After that, they talk about taxes and some recent proposals to make them a whole lot easier. Then they look at the state of the Republican and Democratic presidential races, before ending with a report on the reprieve of Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill, thanks in no small part to the musical bearing his name.

Mini-Break

Mike’s at a political science convention, and so the Guys are taking a one-week break from the podcast. They’ll be back with a new Politics Guys on Sunday, April 17, and a new Ask The Politics Guys on Wednesday, April 20. In the meantime, you can always get a mini-dose of PG by checking out the Facebook page. There are also some PG interviews you might want to give a listen to:

Ask The Politics Guys: Trump, Turnout, and the General Election

Our Ask The Politics Guys question for this week comes from Jeff, in New York:

With Trump’s record turnout state after state, could the case be made that if he’s the nominee of the Republican Party they may lose moderate or “liberal” Republicans (if they still exist) but gain a huge segment of the population that until this point have not been active voters?

PG48: Jobs!, Trump’s Bad Week, A Win For Unions

This week, Mike and Jay start out by talking about some good news – the March jobs report, which continues a trend of good economic news. After that, they look at Bernie’s chances following some big caucus wins, Donald Trump’s very bad week, and how a divided Supreme Court gave a big(ish) win to public sector unions.

Ask The Politics Guys: Question-Palooza!

This week’s Ask The Politics Guys question is actually 10 questions, all submitted by loyal listener Emilie, who gathered up questions from her Year 13 A-Level Government and Politics Class at Bishop Ramsey School in Ruislip, UK.

1. Republicans and Democrats were once described by David Broder to be ‘two bottles, both empty’ – is this still the case in respect of the parties? (from Hemesh)

2. Do pressure groups dominate decision making in the US? (from Talin)

3. Do you think Obama should nominate a new justice? (from Ellie)

4. Clinton said that if elected, she would be interested in nominating Obama, what do you think of this idea? (from Taline)

5. Does money dominate the political process – and does the case of Jeb Bush prove to oppose this argument? (from Miss Robinson and Emilie)

6. Does the whole controversy over gun issues prove the Constitution is not suitable for modern America? (From Ellie)

7. Should the Electoral College be reformed? (from Hemesh)

8. Do you think Affirmative Action should continue? (from Carina)

9. Do you think that news coverage without opinion polls that focuses instead on policy would be preferential – or do you think opinion polls are actually valuable when deciding who to vote for? (from Emilie)

10. What is your opinion on Britain leaving the EU? (from Connor)

PG47: Brussels, Cuba, Primary Updates, and Anti-Gay Laws

This week, Mike and Jay start things off by talking about the terror attacks in Brussels, focusing on how the three people most likely to be the next president – Clinton, Trump, and Cruz – reacted. Then it’s off to Cuba (and Argentina) with President Obama and his whole family. The Guys then take a look at the latest developments in the presidential primaries, and close by considering the anti-LGBTQ legislation recently passed in North Carolina.

Ask The Politics Guys: How Would You Change the Constitution?

This week’s question is a mash-up of two related questions asked by Andrew, from Kalamazoo, Michigan.

What one foundational thing would you most like to change about American politics, and which previous foundational change would you say has had the biggest unintended consequences?

PG46: Kasich’s Folly, Bernie’s Future, and Garland’s Chances

This week, The Politics Guys lead off with the state of the Republican presidential nomination contest. The math says Trump might just barely get the delegates he needs. If he doesn’t, it should make for an interesting convention. Mike and Jay look at what good John Kasich thinks he’s actually doing by staying in the race, and whether or not his continued candidacy is helping Trump. On the Democratic side, the Guys once again pronounce Bernie’s campaign dead, though they think he might be able to keep his message alive. Finally, Mike and Jay discuss whether or not Judge Merrick Garland, who President Obama nominated to take Justice Scalia’s place on the Supreme Court, stands a chance of being confirmed by the Republican Senate.

Ask The Politics Guys: What Do You Guys Read (and Watch)?

This week’s Ask the Politics Guys question has come up a bunch of times from listeners. How do we keep up with political news, and what do we recommend for listeners trying to get a better big-picture understanding of American politics. (We’ll be posting links to all of the recommendations mentioned in this episode on politicsguys.com.)

PG45: Contested Conventions, Violent Rallies, Dreamy Prime Ministers, and Feminist Glaciology

The primary races are once again the top story of the week. Mike and Jay start by looking  at the state of the Republican race: Trump’s chances in Ohio and Florida, what happened to Rubio, and whether Cruz or Kasich have a real shot at the nomination. They also get into how a contested convention would work, and who might come out of it as the Republican nominee. On the Democratic side, they explain why Bernie Sanders’ win in Michigan – stunning as it was – doesn’t really change the race. After that, it’s a brief foray into the state visit of the highly photogenic Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Jay’s discovery of feminist glaciology.