Stay-At-Home Extended, Encouraging Numbers?, SBA Loan Program, Resource Fights, Masks

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This week, Mike and Kristin talk about all things COVID-19. The bigger issues involve President Trump’s extended stay-at-home guidelines, the cultural impact of social distancing and stay-at-home orders, and some encouraging statistics. They also discuss the reality of economic issues we face, jobless numbers, the SBA loan program rolled out this week, states haggling over resources, and changing information about wearing face masks to reduce the virus spread.

This Week’s Recommendations
Mike suggests you check out (and even comment on) The Reluctant Detective, his book in progress. He also recommends the Hulu show Puppy Prep and the rationally optimistic blog post, “No, You Didn’t Just Lose Half of your Retirement Savings.”

Kristin recommends Erik Larson’s Dead Wake, about the Lusitania disaster during WWI and the events and tension leading up to it – and after.  She also recommends the documentary Antarctica: A Year on Ice, a cool take on what it’s like to live and work in the isolated environment of Antarctica.

Be part of the discussion on the Politics Guys ‘BipartisanPolitics’ community on Reddit.

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One thought on “Stay-At-Home Extended, Encouraging Numbers?, SBA Loan Program, Resource Fights, Masks”

  1. Sorry. I’m just not a facebook or other social media type so you get my comments here.

    Mike compared the 1918 flu pandemic and the 1957 flu (I think that was the year) with COVID-19. His overall point is that the death rate is not worse. But that doesn’t take into account the improvements in medical care. There was no such thing as ventilatory care, supplemental oxygen, most of the medications and so on in 1918. In 1957 there would have been some improvement in medical care. But advanced medical care today is leaps and bounds beyond what was available then. Many people would survive COVID-19 with currently available advanced medical care if there was enough to go around.

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